Pydf an Alternative “df” Command to Check Disk Usage in Different Colours

The “pydf” (Python Disk File System) is an advanced command line tool and a good alternative to Linux “df comand”. It is used to display the amount of used and available disk space on a Linux file systems, same like df command, but in different colours. The output of the pydf command can be customizable according to your needs.

Pydf Command to Check Disk Usage

This “pydf” command is written in python language that displays the amount of disk usage and available space on Linux mounted file system, using custom colours for different file system types.

Installing pydf

By default, pydf tool is not installed on Linux distributions, you need to install it using third party repository. So, first enable EPEL repository and afterwards enabling it, use the following “yum command” to install it.

On RHEL/CentOS/Fedora/Scientific Linux

# yum install pydf
Sample Output
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror, security
 Determining fastest mirrors
 epel/metalink        | 4.2 kB 
 * base: mirror.nbrc.ac.in
 * epel: mirrors.ispros.com.bd
 * extras: mirror.nbrc.ac.in
 base  | 3.7 kB 
 epel | 3.9 kB 
 epel/primary_db | 4.2 MB 
 extras | 3.5 kB 
 updates | 3.5 kB 
 updates/primary_db | 1.9 MB 
 Setting up Install Process
 Resolving Dependencies
 --> Running transaction check
 ---> Package pydf.noarch 0:9-3.el6 will be installed
 --> Finished Dependency Resolution
 
 Dependencies Resolved
 
 ==================================================================================================================
 Package Arch  Version  Repository  Size
 ==================================================================================================================
 Installing:
 pydf noarch 9-3.el6  epel 14 k
 
 Transaction Summary
 ==================================================================================================================
 Install 1 Package(s)
 
 Total download size: 14 k
 Installed size: 25 k
 Is this ok [y/N]: y
 Downloading Packages:
 pydf-9-3.el6.noarch.rpm | 14 kB 
 Running rpm_check_debug
 Running Transaction Test
 Transaction Test Succeeded
 Running Transaction
 Installing : pydf-9-3.el6.noarch 1/1 
 Verifying : pydf-9-3.el6.noarch 1/1 
 
 Installed:
 pydf.noarch 0:9-3.el6 
 
 Complete!

On Debian/Ubuntu/Linux Mint

On Debian based distributions, the pydf tool is availabe from package manager system, you can install it using “apt-get command” as shown below.

$ sudo apt-get install pydf
Sample Output
[sudo] password for tecmint: 
 Reading package lists... Done
 Building dependency tree 
 Reading state information... Done
 The following package was automatically installed and is no longer required:
 java-wrappers
 Use 'apt-get autoremove' to remove it.
 The following NEW packages will be installed:
 pydf
 0 upgraded, 1 newly installed, 0 to remove and 10 not upgraded.
 Need to get 12.1 kB of archives.
 After this operation, 70.7 kB of additional disk space will be used.
 Get:1 http://in.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ raring/universe pydf all 10 [12.1 kB]
 Fetched 12.1 kB in 1s (6,097 B/s)
 Selecting previously unselected package pydf.
 (Reading database ... 175568 files and directories currently installed.)
 Unpacking pydf (from .../apt/archives/pydf_10_all.deb) ...
 Processing triggers for man-db ...
 Setting up pydf (10) ...

How to Use pydf Command

If you run only “pydf” command without specifying argument, it will display just information of disk space usage along with all mounted file systems.

# pydf
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
 /dev/sda2 49G 3244M 44G 6.4 [###.....................................] / 
 /dev/sda1 194M 43M 140M 22.4 [#########...............................] /boot 
 /dev/sdb1 492G 345G 122G 70.2 [#########################...............] /data 
 /dev/sda3 39G 4043M 33G 10.0 [####....................................] /home 
 /dev/sda6 55G 33G 19G 60.0 [########################................] /var 
 /dev/sdc1 492G 262G 205G 53.3 [#####################...................] /videos

To check which file system having 0 blocks, simple run the following command along with “-a” or “–all” argument.

# pydf -a
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on 
 /dev/sda2 49G 3244M 44G 6.4 [##..................................] / 
 /dev/sda1 194M 43M 140M 22.4 [########............................] /boot 
 /dev/sdb1 492G 345G 122G 70.2 [#########################...........] /datadevpts 0 0 0 - [....................................] /dev/pts 
 tmpfs 3995M 0 3995M 0.0 [....................................] /dev/shm 
 /dev/sda3 39G 4043M 33G 10.0 [####................................] /home 
 proc 0 0 0 - [....................................] /proc 
 none 0 0 0 - [....................................] /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc
 sysfs 0 0 0 - [....................................] /sys 
 /dev/sda6 55G 33G 19G 60.0 [######################..............] /var 
 sunrpc 0 0 0 - [....................................] /var/lib/nfs/rpc_pipefs/dev/sdc1 492G 262G 205G 53.3 [###################.................] /videos

To see the output in human readable format, use the option “-h”, which will print sizes (e.g., 10K, 10M, 10G).

# pydf -h
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
 /dev/sda2 49G 3244M 44G 6.4 [###.....................................] / 
 /dev/sda1 194M 43M 140M 22.4 [#########...............................] /boot 
 /dev/sdb1 492G 345G 122G 70.2 [############################............] /data
 /dev/sda3 39G 4043M 33G 10.0 [####....................................] /home 
 /dev/sda6 55G 33G 19G 60.0 [########################................] /var 
 /dev/sdc1 492G 262G 205G 53.3 [#####################...................] /videos

To print sizes in kilobytes (e.g., 1024 block size) use option “-k” as shown below.

# pydf -k
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
 /dev/sda2 51606140 3321932 45662768 6.4 [##..................................] / 
 /dev/sda1 198337 44371 143726 22.4 [########............................] /boot 
 /dev/sdb1 516054864 362172932 127667872 70.2 [#########################...........] /data 
 /dev/sda3 41284928 4140032 35047744 10.0 [####................................] /home 
 /dev/sda6 57593092 34575244 20092232 60.0 [######################..............] /var 
 /dev/sdc1 516054864 274980776 214860028 53.3 [###################.................] /videos

To print summary output in megabytes (e.g., 1048576 block size) use option “-m” as shown below.

pydf -m
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
 /dev/sda2 50397 3244 44593 6.4 [##.....................................] / 
 /dev/sda1 194 43 140 22.4 [#########..............................] /boot 
 /dev/sdb1 503960 353685 124675 70.2 [###########################............] /data 
 /dev/sda3 40317 4043 34226 10.0 [####...................................] /home 
 /dev/sda6 56243 33768 19618 60.0 [#######################................] /var 
 /dev/sdc1 503960 268536 209824 53.3 [#####################..................] /videos

To print sizes in gigabytes (e.g., 1073741824), specify option “-g” as shown below.

# pydf -g
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
 /dev/sda2 50397 3244 44593 6.4 [##.....................................] / 
 /dev/sda1 194 43 140 22.4 [#########..............................] /boot 
 /dev/sdb1 503960 353685 124675 70.2 [###########################............] /data 
 /dev/sda3 40317 4043 34226 10.0 [####...................................] /home 
 /dev/sda6 56243 33770 19616 60.0 [#######################................] /var 
 /dev/sdc1 503960 268536 209824 53.3 [#####################..................] /videos

To see the information about inodes instead of blocks, use the argument “-i” as given below.

# pydf -i
Filesystem Nodes Used Avail Use% Mounted on
 /dev/sda2 3200k 78k 3122k 2.5 [#.......................................] / 
 /dev/sda1 50k 40 50k 0.1 [........................................] /boot 
 /dev/sdb1 31M 411k 31M 1.3 [#.......................................] /data 
 /dev/sda3 2560k 3031 2557k 0.1 [........................................] /home 
 /dev/sda6 3576k 873k 2703k 24.4 [##########..............................] /var 
 /dev/sdc1 31M 2033k 29M 6.4 [###.....................................] /videos

If you want to disable colourised output, simply use the option “–bw“.

# pydf --bw
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
 /dev/sda2 49G 3244M 44G 6.4 [###.....................................] / 
 /dev/sda1 194M 43M 140M 22.4 [#########...............................] /boot 
 /dev/sdb1 492G 345G 122G 70.2 [############################............] /data 
 /dev/sda3 39G 4043M 33G 10.0 [####....................................] /home 
 /dev/sda6 55G 33G 19G 60.1 [########################................] /var 
 /dev/sdc1 492G 262G 205G 53.3 [#####################...................] /videos

How to Customize pydf Colours

The pydf has its own configuration file, where you can define your own custom colours to give some extra feel and look to your output.

# vi /etc/pydfrc

For more information read man pages of pydf command by hitting “man pydf” in a terminal.

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4 thoughts on “Pydf an Alternative “df” Command to Check Disk Usage in Different Colours”

  1. Nice idea but you seem to have forgotten two specifics. Linux is NOT one or two particular distros and not all distros have the same things in their repositories. It would therefore be nice if you included the location of the sources or some way of manually installing it onto something other than a Red Hat or Ubuntu templated system.

    Reply

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